Stage programme

Programme Schedule Description
Opening 12:00-12:05
Samulnori (사물놀이) 12:05-12:20 Samulnori refers to the performance of four musicians playing and dancing each with a different Korean traditional

percussion instrument. The Korean words “samul” means “four things”, and “nori” means “to play” hence “the playing of four things.”

Floral Coronet Dance (Hwagwanmu 화관무) 12:20-12:30 Hwagwanmu, floral coronet dance, was created based on the elegant mood of royal banquets and the court dances that were performed on festive occasions.
Taekwondo Striking & Breaking

(태권도 발차기 & 격파)

12:30-12:45 Taekwondo is the Korean martial art form and sport that uses the hands and feet for attack and defense. The ultimate goal of Taekwondo is to develop the character and personality of the practitioner through physical, mental and spiritual discipline.

Techniques of striking a target with the feet by extending or turning legs. They are the skills to dominate the opponent in a confrontation by delivering a strike with the foot. They are offensive skills using the power generated from flexing and extending the knee or swinging the leg.

Gyeokpa (breaking) is a variety of techniques of breaking hard objects with hands or feet.

This is the process of demonstrating the power and skills one has developed through the study of taekwondo by breaking objects.

Mask Dance

(Talchum 탈춤)

12:45-12:50 The traditional Korean mask dance, or Talchum, is a form of drama featuring the wearing of masks, singing and dancing. Traditional mask dances are found throughout the Korean Peninsula and each regional variation displays distinctive characteristics.
Taepyeongso & Janggo

(태평소 & 장고)

12:50-12:57 The taepyeongso (lit. “big peace wind instrument”; also called hojok, hojeok, or nallari) is a Korean double reed wind instrument in the shawm or oboe family. The loud and piercing sound it produces has kept it confined mostly to Korean folk music (especially “farmer’s band music”) and to marching bands, the latter performed for royalty in the genre known as daechwita. It is, however, also used in the court genre known as Jongmyo Jeryeak (Royal Ancestral Shrine music).

Janggo is one of the leather percussion instruments consisting of an hour-glass shaped body with two heads (hides or skins) lapped onto metal hoops placed over the open ends of the body and secured by counter-hoops. Since the performer can use his/her hands as well as sticks, various sounds and tempo, deep and full, soft and tender, menacing sounds, and fast and slow beats – can be created to suit the mood of the audience.

DJ 12:57-13:07 K-Pop music videos will be shown on a screen.
Dance of a Spring Nightingale

(Chunaengjeon 춘앵전)

13:07-13:15 Chunaengjeon is a solo dance which is hard to find in Korean court dances. This brilliant court repertory was created by Crown Prince Hyomyeong in the 28th year of King Sunjo’s reign (1828) to congratulate the 40th birthday of Queen Suk. Crown Prince Hyomyeong wrote the lyrics himself after being inspired by the beautiful twitter of a nightingale sitting on the willow tree branch on a warm spring day.
Taekwondo Poomsae & Breaking

(태권도 품새 & 격파)

13:15-13:30 Taekwondo Poomsae is the style of conduct which expresses directly or indirectly mental and physical refinements as well as the principles of offense and defense resulting from cultivation of Taekwondo spirit and techniques.
Sword Dance

(Geommu 검무)

13:30-13:40 Geommu (sword dance) is a dance to commemorate the courage of Gwanchang, a Hwarang warrior of Silla. Dancers dress in hats and top garments of soldiers and spun around swords as they dance, creating a sense of tension. They move in perfect sync as if they were playing war games, make various line formations and end with fast spinning motions that formed the climax of the performance.
DJ 13:40-14:00 K-Pop music videos will be shown on a screen.
Sogo Dance

(Sogochum 소고춤)

14:00-14:10 Sogochum is a dance with sogo, a small hand drum, about 15 inches in diameter. The dancers hold the hand drum on one hand and beats the drumhead with a stick. Drums and singing have been a part of Korean music that goes back thousands of years. This dance has its roots in the peasants’ percussion band, nongak. In nongak, the sogo players are usually positioned at the head of the line of musicians and they perform chumsawi, expressive traditional dance movements that evoke heung (excitement) and meot (style).
Sŏlchanggo

(설장고)

14:10-14:25 ‘Sŏl’ means ‘the best’. Hence, ‘Sŏlchanggo’ originally referred to performance that only the best of changgo players can deliver, in order to demonstrate the playing techniques in the kaein nori, an ‘individual play’ movement of an entertainment-based p’ungmul performance, p’an kut.
Jindo Drum Dance

(Jindo-bukchum 진도북춤)

14:25-14:35 Jindo Drum Dance is a dance in which the Korean percussive instrument is tied to the dancer. The dance has roots in nong-ak, which was traditionally performed in rice farming villages in order to ensure and to celebrate good harvest. This is an intense and dynamic dance that blends the beat of the powerful drum and the graceful movements of the dancer.
Taekwondo Striking, Poomsae & Breaking 14:35-14:50 Techniques of striking a target with the feet by extending or turning legs. They are the skills to dominate the opponent in a confrontation by delivering a strike with the foot. They are offensive skills using the power generated from flexing and extending the knee or swinging the leg.

Taekwondo Poomsae is the style of conduct which expresses directly or indirectly mental and physical refinements as well as the principles of offense and defense resulting from cultivation of Taekwondo spirit and techniques.

Gyeokpa (breaking) is a variety of techniques of breaking hard objects with hands or feet.

This is the process of demonstrating the power and skills one has developed through the study of taekwondo by breaking objects.

Fan Dance

(Buchaechum 부채춤)

14:50-15:00 Buchaechum is a traditional form of Korean dance also called a fan dance, usually performed by groups of Korean female dancers. Koreans use this dance during many celebrations. Dancers use large fans painted with pink peony blossoms and display a show of dance. In the dance being performed, the dancers represent shaped images using the fans e.g. birds, flowers, butterflies and waves.
DJ 15:00-15:20 K-Pop music videos will be shown on a screen.
Hanbok Fashion Show 15:20-15:50 Korean traditional dance performers will present beautiful Hanbok costumes they wear on stage.
Announcement 15:50-16:00
K-Pop World Festival 16:00-18:30 1.   ALO (dance)

2.   KNOCKOUT (dance)

3.   Ami (vocal)

4.   T2C (dance)

5.   UPDC (dance)

6.   Danny Tran (vocal)

7.   Chu-X2 (dance)

8.   Sebbe & Q (vocal)

9.   EVIOLITE (dance)

10.  Ida Njie (vocal)

11.  S.G-SYNC (dance)

12.  Q & SinCi (vocal)

13.  IRI5 (dance)

14.  Sanna Wermelin (vocal)

15.  ToXIC$ (dance)

16.  The Royal Army (dance)

Korean Film Screening 18:30-20:30 How to Steal A Dog (2014)

Director: KIM Sung-ho

Genres: Drama, Family

Running time: 109 mins

Ji-so is a 10-year old girl living with her mom and a little brother, Ji-suk, in a pizza truck. Ji-so and her friend, Chae-rang, decide to get a house on their own. Now, their scheme is to find a rich dog, steal it and then return it back to its owner by pretending to have found it. Will Ji-so, Chae-rang, and unexpectedly smart Ji-suk succeed in carrying out sneaky dog-stealing plot?

– See more at: http://www.koreanfilm.or.kr/jsp/films/index/filmsView.jsp?movieCd=20130574#sthash.hm6Cbyz7.dpuf